blizzard baby spinach cheddar frittatas

Well hello from the … bottom of a snowdrift. It’s been a while since I’ve been here and it apparently takes a blizzard to get me back in the kitchen. So, a big thanks to Snowzilla because the result of my cookfest was delicious with a subtle, fluffy soufflé quality. More importantly, you and I are ♥ together again ♥ on this glittery blog, even if for just a bittersweet brunchy food moment. Scroll down to the very bottom of this post for the recipe, otherwise you will be forced to endure stories and more … words.

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Just look at that crispy snow peak of cheese glistening on the side of this baby.

Speaking of cheese, did you know that most orange cheddar cheese is dyed orange?!?!? Within the past year, I started shopping at MOM’s Organic Market and one day I could not find orange sharp cheddar cheese. “Where is the orange cheese!?!” I mumbled to myself maniacally while digging through piles of cheese blocks like some sort of starved lunatic. I was not looking for plastic American slices, just so you know. I was searching for a block of orange cheddar to slice up for something hot and melty.

I asked the lady with the MOM’s apron where the cheddar was and she pointed to a bunch of white cheese. I mentioned something about “orange” and she looked at me like I was insane, so I just thanked her and stopped the conversation immediately before any further organic illiteracy humiliation ensued. In this very moment, I wondered why cheese is orange anyway and then it dawned on me. Yep. It’s fake. No cows produce orange milk. It’s not horrible news, but just a totally unnecessary step. To learn more, read these two stories on the origin of cheese dying: NPR cheese stuff and Cheese Underground cheese stuff.

Wait, why am I here? Cheese tangent. Ok … frittatas. This is the cheese I used for these little babies and the flavor is amazing. Cut up into little matchsticks for even distribution in the frittata:
raw-cheddar
Cheeeeeeeese.

Over the past year, I have also found myself logging into this blog often (because I made it private, so I had to log in to see it … because I had no blow-me-away recipes or content at all … so I assumed nobody in the universe wanted to see it … so I was having a “moment” and made it private for a year, ok? #sowhat) to find out how to cook things that I had previously written about. Well, today (at this very moment in time), I thought it would be brilliant to use this as a recipe depository for myself and the other five people who read it. So, that is what is happening … currently. But, I cannot guarantee I won’t change my mind in a week and completely delete the entire site, Jason Statham style. You really never know with me.

jason-statham-the-mechanic-movie-image
BOOM goes the blog.

Here are pictures of other food stuffs that went into the recipe. I love the PhotoGrid app. A lot. Obviously.
frittata_ingredients
Random note: see how a couple of the egg yolks are darker/richer in color (the two on the right)? Those are two from a newer pack of eggs from a local farm in Pennsylvania. The first four eggs were from a regular pack of eggs, possibly still organic, but not sure if local. A coincidence or is this “a thing”? Maybe farmer peeps out there can fill me in on the nature of eggs!

I’ll also share that I’m definitely an experimenter more than a tester. You will not find me making a recipe 75 times before I write the perfect post. I’m just way too hangry for that. I’ll usually search for something in a cookbook or online, try it, and post it if it was reasonably delicious and, most importantly, if I would make it again. And I might tell you things I would change next time I make it, if necessary. If it’s gross or a remote failure, believe me, I will not waste my time mentioning it. Then, I move on with the next thing in life.

frittata_pan_collage
The three stages of the baby frittatas: layering the insides, pouring egg mixture over, and the finished golden fluffy heaven cheesy babies.

Seriously, there is a recipe in here somewhere. But would I be human if I didn’t post one post-blizzard shot? No … I would be a robot. I like how the snow sort of looks like a sand drift on the beach.
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Romantic snowdrifts. Like sand at the beach, but not at all.

Omg, it’s here, it’s here. The recipe.
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blizzard baby spinach cheddar frittatas!
(adapted from quichetata recipe on Alida’s Kitchen)

yields 9 standard cupcake sized babies

the goods:
part 1:
1 cup chopped fresh organic spinach/arugula mix (regular spinach mix is fine, but they were out of 100% spinach at all the stores … ahhhhh #snowzilla!!!)
1/4 cup fire-roasted red peppers, from jar, diced
1/3 cup shredded cheddar cheese, or cut into rough matchsticks from a block
coconut oil, for prepping the pan

part 2:
♣ 6 large eggs
♣ 1/2 cup liquid egg whites
♣ 1/3 cup your favorite roasted garlic hummus
♣ garlic powder, two dashes
♣ oregano, two dashes
♣ black pepper, go crazy depending on how much you love it
♣ salt, optional, not recommended
(Note: I didn’t add salt even as these were served – hummus already has salt in it and the powerful flavors of the oregano, cheese and garlic powder gave it great flavor without added salt).

do it up:
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Put a couple tablespoons of coconut oil in a small ramekin and use a paper towel to grease 9 cupcake wells. (Cooking spray will ruin your nonstick pans over time :( and coconut oil is healthier!)

In each of the greased wells, place the chopped spinach, then chopped roasted peppers, then the cheese. Set aside pan for a moment.

In a large bowl, add the last six ingredients: eggs, egg whites, hummus, garlic powder, oregano, black pepper. Whisk it up (!) until combined and a bit frothy. Distribute this evenly over the veggies/cheese in the 9 prepped cups.

Bake for 13-15 minutes. (Mine came out perfectly at 14 minutes. Anything before 14, the centers were still jiggly. Some of the tops will appear glistening and not cooked, but it’s just the cheese rising to the top of some of the cups. So, take them from the oven when they no longer jiggle and look loose in the center. They’ll be firm and start to puff up around the edges.)

Let sit in pan for a few minutes. Then, serve hot and steamy and do a little blizzard dance!!! I removed mine from the cups with a soft silicone spatula. These babies like to dance around too, but you will be smitten once you get them on the plate.

Enjoy! ♥c

12 thoughts on “blizzard baby spinach cheddar frittatas

Add yours

  1. ummmm… spinach/cheese frittata and jason in one delicious post? yes, please!
    I’ve made similar recipes but never considered putting hummus in it– good idea– thanks.

  2. Good morning Channing. Glad you are back. You really made my morning. I am very inspired to try though I lack some ingredients and the cup cake pan. Will still try. And I learned important things: about the orange cheddar (can not believe it never occurred to me though I spent my summers on the farm) and Jason.
    Wish me luck.
    Ausra

    1. Hi Ausra! Thank you!! That is so nice to hear!! This would probably also work in any pan, like a loaf pan or pie pan, but tiny food is definitely more fun! I’m also loving all the enthusiasm for Jason!!! :) Enjoy! xo

  3. Yay, you’re back! :)

    First, you’re hilarious. Second, those fritatas look great! I’ve made similar ones before, but not in a while, and you’ve reminded me I should make them more often. They’re good to make in advance and reheat on busy mornings. And I’ve never thought to add hummus to them! Super smart.

    Oh, and that egg yolk color thing? Yeah, usually chickens that get to free range outside and dig for bugs and weeds and stuff have orangier yolks. Higher in omega 3’s, too! But, they also make some chicken feed with geranium petals in it to color the yolks, so color isn’t necessarily a guarantee that they’re great eggs.

    Looking forward to more!!
    —Ty

    1. Ty!!!!! It’s great to be back! :) You should fire up your frittata making, for sure! So, so tasty and I like eating them for dinner sometimes too!

      Thank you for clearing up the egg yolk conundrum!! I knew you would provide some expert info! That is so interesting to know – especially about the geranium petals!! Wow, I guess you really don’t know the full story unless you raise them yourself! I grant you the free range chicken egggspert from now on!! :)

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